(See also Pease family in England)


In 1626 Salem, Massachusetts was founded. In 1627 John Woodbury left Salem to recruit settlers from the east counties of England.  In 1629 King Charles I dismissed Parliament and set out to rule on his own.  This helped to incite immigration fever.  In 1630 John Winthrop sailed to New England with 1000 people, but he settled in Boston.


Essex County, England was a hotbed of Puritan activity and with 266 people sailing to America from 1620 to 1650, it was the 2nd highest county in the country for immigration. About 1628 Thomas Hooker was appointed lecturer at St. Mary's Church in Great Baddow.  The Pease brothers left England on the ship, “Francis” about 11 months after John Cotton and Thomas Hooker. Undoubtedly these 2 Puritan preachers has great influence on their decision.


For the first several years after Salem was founded in 1626 the people held church in homes. The men sat on one side and the women and children on the other. Roger Williams arrived in Salem in 1634, as did Anne Hutchison, which was also the same year the Pease brothers arrived. Mrs. Hutchison held meetings in her home. John Pease's wife, Lucy and her parents were followers of Hutchison which soon caused difficulties for John. In 1636 Roger Williams was banished from the colony. He founded Providence, Rhode Island, where Anne Hutchison also fled, along with Samuel Gorton and his followers, including Lucy's parents.


John probably went back to England in 1638 to get the rest of the family (his mother and his nephew).


These are the generations of the American Pease family (my line). Click on any link to go to another page.


  1. 1.John Pease, b 1608 England, m Lucy (Weston or Reeves).

  2. 2.James Pease, Sr., b 1637 Massachusetts, m Elizabeth Norton. Buried Tower Grove Cemetery on Martha’s Vineyard

  3. 3.James Pease, Jr., b abt 1664 Massachusetts, m Hannah Dunham.  Hannah's father, Rev. Jonathan Dunham was a missionary to the Indians and pastor of the church in Edgartown (Martha's Vineyard), Mass. from 1685 to 1717  (see Dunham’s tombstone at right).

  4. 4. Nathan Pease, b 1687, Edgartown, Massachusetts, m Sarah Vincent

5. Christopher Pease I, b 1717 in Edgartown (Martha's Vineyard) Massachusetts, 1746 moved to Lebanon, CT where he  m Hannah Hill(s) 1748. Moved to Hartford, VT in 1763, being among the first settlers there. Died, buried there.

6. Christopher Pease II, 1751, Lebanon, CT. Moved with his parents to Hartford, VT 1763. m Rebekah Wright 1770. Died 1842, Harford, Ct. Buried Hilltop Cem.

7. Christopher Pease III, b 1791 in Hartford, Vermont, m Hannah Randall. Christopher and Hannah moved to Winona Co, Minnesota with their children and died there in 1873/74. Buried Whitewater twp. (Children: Clementine died in RI; Sophia moved to MN then to KS; Miles moved to MN then to MO; Chris IV moved to MN; Lewis moved to NY; Ermina moved to MN, then to CA, then to MO, Cordelia moved to MN, married Susan Metcalf's brother & died there.)
Other Peases from New England also moved to Minnesota. Today there is a town called Pease, MN (abt 30 miles N of Minneapolis)

  1. 8.Miles Pease, b 1822 in Hartford, Vermont, m Susan Metcalf. Moved to Minnesota, then to Missouri where he died.  Picture of Susan Pease and their 5 sons: Alando, Myron, George, Clinton & Clarence.

  2. 9.Myron Pease, b 1855, NH, m Winnie Johnson & Eva White in MO; d MO 1940, buried Dora, MO.



Site map: Pease line - John Pease (Am. emigrant) -  Christopher III -  

Miles' family -  Alando - Clinton - Myron - Susan & sons -  Myron's Writings -

Myron's children: Walter - Myrtle - Byron & Norton - Herschel Jack - Minnie - Opal - Susie -

Bethany School - home page




Please email me any corrections or additions.


 
The Pease family... comes to America

The first meeting house or church in Salem, built in 1634,

measuring 20'x17'

Early Salem, Massachusetts

Related books:




Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America (America: a Cultural History)  

Fascinating book on how 4 strains of English immigration has imprinted American culture.  In other words, why we developed into an English-culture nation even though we had early immigrants from all over Europe




The Annals Of Salem: From Its First Settlement  

This is a record of events in Salem and has info on John Pease's in-laws, the Westons, and their involvement with Gorton.











Early Pease - fun book of stories from American history of Pease family members.